Dr. Anne Mathieu

Senior Investment Manager

Anne Mathieu is a seasoned healthcare investor with extensive experience across the healthcare investment spectrum from Venture Capital, Growth Equity to Large Cap.

Prior to joining MTIP, Anne was the healthcare Equity specialist for Lombard Odier Asset Management. She was responsible for fundamental valuation analysis of companies in all the sub-sectors of the healthcare industry worldwide (medtech, diagnostics, biotech, pharma, healthcare services).

She had prior work experience in Venture Capital / Growth Equity investment working for PM Equity Partner in Switzerland and New York. She was involved across the whole investment cycle from the sourcing, due diligence, investment and management of portfolio companies (incl. board representation, CFO interim mandate).

Anne began her career at EY in the Advisory department advising C-Suite clients in Switzerland.

She earned her PharmD from the University of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Bordeaux and her MSc in Management, Grande Ecole from ESSEC Business School in Paris.

Which trend inspires you the most?

The healthcare system is inefficient and extremely expensive (health spending represented c. 18% of US GDP in 2021). Digitalization of the healthcare industry is essential to bring efficiency in the system: increasing health outcomes for patients and reducing health spending at an individual and global level.

What inspires you about your job?

We play an active role in the transformation of the healthcare industry. With finding the right innovations and working hand-in-hand with portfolio companies’ management, we have the opportunity to positively impact the healthcare ecosystem.

My favorite innovation?

Diabetes has a massive prevalence (> 400m patients worldwide) and generates tremendous health expenditures (c. $1tn in 2021). Innovations such as Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices, Insulin Pumps (and their interoperability) as well as Behavioral Change Platforms have significantly contributed to improve diabetes management. There is still some white space for further innovation as it remains a largely unmet medical need.